Guys Archive

The Lasting Impact of Abortion—an Interview with Kelly Roy

Revive Our Hearts recently featured a series on abortion. Kelly Roy was one of three individuals interviewed by Nancy Leigh DeMoss as part of that series. I thought Kelly’s story was especially compelling because she is a Christian who was raised in a Christian home and yet when faced with an unplanned pregnancy at the age of 20, she decided to have an abortion.

Kelly’s story may not be as unique as you’d think. Researchers estimate that as many as 1 in 5 women who have an abortion are Christians. I see this as an important point of conversation for us here on the blog. I asked Kelly for an in-depth interview. Her honest answers are a powerful reminder of the gravity of this issue. Take a look.

It’s All About Me

I saw an interesting bumper sticker this week. It said simply, “It’s all about me!” I thought to myself, “Really? That’s the one statement you want to make to the world?” Of all the things that person could have taken a stand for by their bumper sticker choice, political endorsements, a love for a certain cause, etc., they chose to announce their selfishness? I rolled my eyes and kept on driving.

But as I drove I began to feel the gentle tug of the Holy Spirit on my heart. And while I don’t have the bumper sticker to prove it, I was faced with the fact that all to often, I too live like it’s all about me.

What Can We Learn From the World’s Largest Pumpkin?

If you’re anything like me, these kinds of records fascinate you. In fact, most of us are drawn to the idea of doing something spectacular, even if it’s as silly as choreographing the world’s largest coke fountain.

But, this idea that performance equals value can easily trip us up. It’s true that the people who are listed in the Guinness Book of World Records have accomplished something extraordinary. But does that mean that they have more value than those of us who haven’t been a part of a giant human peace sign or sat in a tub filled with rattlesnakes?

My thoughts on your beauty

Several of you have recently commented about your struggle to feel beautiful. This is a common area of heartbreak for young women. In fact, the challenge to embrace my own beauty and worth has been one of the most intense struggles of my life and I know that I am not alone. I have personally witnessed the turmoil that many of you experience in this area and I know how widespread those feelings are among your generation.

Truth or Bare Fashion Tests

Modesty has become a hot topic here on the blog. In fact, almost 150 of you have left comments on our previous posts about the subject (if you haven’t read them yet, check out our archives).

Most of you seem to “get” why dressing modestly matters. In fact, I have been blown away by the number of you who are willing to buck the culture by taking a stand in this area. But one trip down the swimsuit aisle is enough to remind me that finding clothes that are both fashionable and modest can seem like mission impossible.

Are Beautiful Girls Really Worth More?

I recently saw a news story about a website that is gaining popularity at an incredible rate. In fact, the site snagged one million new members last month alone. I won’t share the web address, because it’s not a site I want to encourage you to visit (if you’re anything like me, you’d be googleing it as soon as you read it, just to satisfy your curiosity). But, I do think that it’s worth mentioning the site’s premise.

The website is designed as a place where users can play a virtual fashion game. The ultimate goal is to “become the hottest, coolest most intelligent and talented [girl] the world has ever known.” Sounds easy enough right?

But Why Can’t I Look Like Her? A Look at Our Need to Compare

I bet you’ve played a version of the comparison game. Maybe you are constantly judging whether or not other girls are smarter than you, or more popular or more athletic. Maybe you find yourself in constant competition with an older sibling or the flawless celebrities that grace every magazine cover. Maybe you’re always on the lookout to see who is taller or shorter, better or worse dressed or more or less talented than you. The irresistible need to compare seems to be a part of our fabric as women.